The First Word – A Journey Into The Unknown

Hi guys! 

I hope that the first week of October has been good for you. 

This week I’d like to talk about my journey into the written word. 

It started when I was thirteen in the third year of secondary school. Secondary is the UK version of High School. This was when I was being re integrated back into the system as I’d been home tutored due to being badly bullied. 

A familiar question writers get asked is where did the inspiration come from to write? 

To this day I’m still trying to figure that one out. 

All I can remember is sitting down at a computer and after exhausting the option to ‘paint’, an application that’s on most Windows PC’S I opened a Microsoft Word Document where my fingers began typing away. 

I felt this incredible buzz that was out of this world. 

Soon, I was spending all the time I could get at school writing. That became my first attempt at writing a novel. 

As most first novels it was a total mess. It didn’t have a theme. It had no real plot line and the characters were hard to read. 

The story was actually a cross over between the movie Bring It On which is a film about cheerleading and the award winning drama Bad Girls about a women’s prison. I was obsessed with the two of them at that age and anyone reading it would be able to tell that. 

I don’t possess a copy of it anymore as it was a part of the school’s system. I did print it out, but I’ve misplaced it somewhere and can’t find it. 

Although it was a total flop it did teach me two things. 

One – it doesn’t matter how you start a novel or piece of writing at the beginning. All that’s important is getting the words down no matter how they come to you. 

Two – to enjoy the creation process. 

So, there you have it. 

Sometimes it’s not about the destination, but enjoying the scenery as you travel. 

Same goes for writing, or any part of life, really. 

Thanks for reading, 

Until next week, 

Blaze

With thanks to Dariusz Sankowski for the image via Unsplash.com. 

The Nightmare Of Writing Descriptively

image

Hi guys!

With writing comes descriptive writing. Without it, readers will get bored. You can’t have the building without any windows to see out of.

Whoever heard of a house with no windows?

Whoever heard of a book without  description?

Having said that I can imagine that you’ll tell me that such a thing exists.

Still, I use it in a matter of speaking.

My dislike for descriptive writing probably comes from my boredom. It doesn’t excite me.

And that’s a problem.

But beneath that boredom lies inability. I find myself unable to describe buildings, faces, emotions, objects.

All those things stifle me. I spend too long trying to think of a beautiful paragraph to describe something.

By that time my idea for another part will disappear.

This is something I’ve been trying to overcome since my teenage years, but it’s not shifting.

I’ve tried exercises, but the same thing keeps happening. I struggle a little too long, boredom sets in and I lose interest.

I know that it’s something I have to overcome if I am considering publishing. No one is going to want an undescriptive book.

It’s just getting there.

That’s half the battle.

Does anyone else have this struggle?

How did you overcome it?

Let me know in the comment section below.

Until next week,

Blaze

With thanks to Liz Bridges for the image via Unsplash.com

The Nightmare Of Writing Descriptively

image

Hi guys!

With writing comes descriptive writing. Without it, readers will get bored. You can’t have the building without any windows to see out of.

Whoever heard of a house with no windows?

Whoever heard of a book without  description?

Having said that I can imagine that you’ll tell me that such a thing exists.

Still, I use it in a matter of speaking.

My dislike for descriptive writing probably comes from my boredom. It doesn’t excite me.

And that’s a problem.

But beneath that boredom lies inability. I find myself unable to describe buildings, faces, emotions, objects.

All those things stifle me. I spend too long trying to think of a beautiful paragraph to describe something.

By that time my idea for another part will disappear.

This is something I’ve been trying to overcome since my teenage years, but it’s not shifting.

I’ve tried exercises, but the same thing keeps happening. I struggle a little too long, boredom sets in and I lose interest.

I know that it’s something I have to overcome if I am considering publishing. No one is going to want an undescriptive book.

It’s just getting there.

That’s half the battle.

Does anyone else have this struggle?

How did you overcome it?

Let me know in the comment section below.

Until next week,

Blaze

With thanks to Liz Bridges for the image via Unsplash.com